Engagement 1In the HR world, there’s been a lot of buzz lately about hiring for “culture” and “fit,” but what does that really mean? How does hiring the right person based on a team or company’s culture translate to the day-to-day business operations?  

 

 

Top 7 Do’s and Don’ts for Creating a Collaborative Team Culture

In the HR world, there’s been a lot of buzz lately about hiring for “culture” and “fit,” but what does that really mean? How does hiring the right person based on a team or company’s culture translate to the day-to-day business operations?

Experts have found that collaborative teams that embrace a similar mission are more likely to inspire innovative ideas and drive greater results and productivity. They’re also more likely to have fun while working, which is equally important for engagement and retention.

Ted Malley

“If you want teams to be productive, it’s all about building better relationships and developing trust. It’s important that leaders help coach employees to more effectively communicate and work together so the team can achieve positive outcomes.”

- Ted Malley, SVP Product Evangelist, Ceridian

While recruiters are consciously thinking about “fit” when interacting with candidates, HR and individual team managers need to actively encourage cooperation and collaboration among their existing team’s working relationships. Below are some do’s and don’ts when it comes to fostering productive relationships among your employees.

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     DO

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 DON'T

Your best to match employees with the right roles. Each team member should have the opportunity to use their strengths and talents when working on individual or team projects. When managers assign team projects, they should ensure they pull together employees to balance skill sets and eliminate gaps.Complain about someone behind their back. Tattling, grumbling or general negative talk about teammates, managers or the company isn’t going to help anyone. While you don’t have to follow the saying, “If you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all,” openly confronting the person, situation or conflict is the best way to resolve tension.
Encourage team members to get to know each other and socialize. Gallup has found that one of the strongest indicators of an engaged employee is having a good friend at work. Planning team-building activities and supporting social ties should be an important part of strengthening a team’s working relationship.Hold back on praise. Whether working on a specific team project or not, employees appreciate being recognized for good work, both individually and as a team. Limiting positive feedback can hinder performance and make employees feel undervalued. Instead, encourage praise that is deserved and model positive behavior to encourage reciprocity among teammates.
Evaluate teamwork as a part of performance reviews. If you want to create a culture of teamwork, companies need to make it a part of their more formal review processes. Employees are more likely to take the goal seriously when they see it as a priority for the company. It also offers another touch point for employees to check in and offer their own feedback on how the organization supports teamwork.Shy away from transparency or hide company-wide business goals and initiatives. Employees need to see how their work relates to the company's success and how their efforts make a difference in achieving those goals. Help employees see their work from a big picture perspective, and they will be more motivated to help you get there.


Thumbs upLastly, DO consider tools and resources that can help employees have more productive work relationships. For example, resources like the TeamRelate app assesses employees on four communication styles. It then uses those results to help pair employees so they can have more effective team interactions. Tools like these also help people better appreciate each others’ strengths and work styles. 

For more information:

  • Learn about TeamRelate
  • Learn about Ceridian LifeWorks