What comes to mind when you hear the word performance management? If you’re like most people, you immediately think of the annual performance review. However, effective performance management involves much more than the official review and should be thought about more than once a year. 

Is Your Organization Fumbling Performance Management?

Football & Tee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What comes to mind when you hear the word performance management? If you’re like most people, you immediately think of the annual performance review. However, effective performance management involves much more than the official review and should be thought about more than once a year.

When done correctly, managing performance is similar to being a football coach. Like coaching, effective performance management provides timely, constructive and forward-thinking feedback. Let’s take a timeout and discover how thinking like a football coach can help your managers effectively guide, support and invest in their employees.

The playbook – Use a variety of tactics and approaches

Just as you would expect to see more than one play in a football coach’s playbook, managers should use more than just the annual performance review to provide feedback to employees. While official performance discussions are important, they should be part of a broader performance strategy. This strategy should use different approaches and conversation starters depending on the employee’s growth areas and career aspirations.

Team huddle – Conduct regular, recurring coaching sessions

Just as football coaches would never go through an entire game without talking with players, your managers should discuss performance with employees more than once a year. The annual official performance review is merely one conversation in a broader dialogue between the manager and the employee about their strength and development areas. Nothing the manager shares during the evaluation – either bad or good – should be a surprise to the employee.

Sideline encouragement – Give constructive feedback

Good sideline coaching is specific, constructive and personalized. Performance discussions should be a two-way dialogue tailored to helping the individual grow as a professional. In addition, managers should give positive reinforcement for improvements made, not just for excellence. Encouraging employees when they make progress demonstrates the manager’s faith in them and compels them to keep moving forward.

The locker room – Encourage peer feedback & coaching

In sports, the locker room is where the real magic of the team happens. Players debriefing in the locker room after practices and games often share very direct feedback on how peers performed. In the same way, managers should encourage those on their team to help each other grow and improve. How an individual operates in the broader team should also be considered and discussed as part of performance management.

Practice, practice, practice – Provide growth opportunities

In football, practice is a time for the players to refine their skills and try new plays. Professionals also need opportunities to stretch themselves through leadership initiatives and growth projects. Managers should help employees grow by providing them with a safe environment to try something new and make mistakes.

Football Plays

 

 

 

 

 

 

The varsity team – Discuss career development

Just as coaches aim to take their players to the next level, managers should encourage employees to think about the next step in their career. Career development requires the employee’s dedication to learn new skills and the supervisor’s commitment to provide opportunities for development. Career growth doesn’t just mean moving up the ladder, but also broadening employees’ skills so that they can take on new responsibilities in their current role.

 

The win-win equation

“Performance management is an often overlooked aspect of employee engagement and retention. Managers who provide quality feedback to employees are demonstrating an investment in the employee – which is one of the most powerful things a supervisor can do. Supported employees feel valued and valued employees stay with the company. This is a win-win equation for everyone involved,” said Jen Piliero, senior product manager for Ceridian LifeWorks.

While official performance reviews are unlikely to go away any time soon, managers can bring value to reviews by incorporating them into a broader, year-long performance management strategy. This approach will transform performance reviews from an obligation to a tool that helps employees grow. Ready, set, hut!

For more information:

  • Explore Ceridian LifeWorks’ manager resource Bringing out the Best in the People you Manage (To access this article use the username: lifeworksnew and the password: demo)
  • Learn about Ceridian Performance Management
  • Read Ceridian blog posts 3 Way to Extract True Value from Performance Reviews