In its annual State of the American Workplace report, research and polling firm Gallup deemed that only 30 percent of American workers are actively engaged in their tasks. That leaves 70 percent of the workforce disengaged with their jobs, which Gallup estimates is costing the American economy $450 to $550 billion in lost productivity each year. 

How Bolstering Wellness Initiatives can Foster Employee Engagement

In its annual State of the American Workplace report, research and polling firm Gallup deemed that only 30 percent of American workers are actively engaged in their tasks. That leaves 70 percent of the workforce disengaged with their jobs, which Gallup estimates is costing the American economy $450 to $550 billion in lost productivity each year.

For employers looking to reverse this trend, working to ensure that employees feel cared for and supported in all facets of their work and personal lives can be an important step in creating a more committed and engaged workforce. One simple solution that can help with bolstering engagement is offering a robust wellness program as part of an overall employee benefits package.

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- Gallup reported that only 3 in 10 workers are actively engaged in their jobs. - 

Wellness in the workplace

According to a new survey from the Society for Human Resources Management (SHRM), many employers are cutting traditional perks, such as offering relocation benefits or floating holidays, and instead favoring programs that promote wellness. In fact, the number of companies offering rewards or bonuses for completing certain health and wellness programs is up 20 percent since 2009.

Jennifer Piliero, senior product manager for Ceridian LifeWorks, says, “Here at Ceridian, we have seen a rise in companies looking to implement wellness initiatives. Employers have begun to recognize the link between a healthier workforce and a more engaged workforce.”

Moreover, Piliero says, “It’s important for companies to not lose sight of how wellness programs can work as a ‘softer’ benefit for improving engagement, productivity and retention. Services like health risk assessments and health coaching can go a long ways towards helping your employees feel happier and healthier both on and off the job.”

One reason wellness programs are becoming so popular is not only because they benefit employees, but also because they can mitigate employer’s health care costs and help them become cost-neutral in just five years[1]. When it comes to engagement specifically, the companies that participated in the U.S. Department of Labor study reported employee morale boosts during and after rolling out their respective wellness programs.

Making wellness programs work for you

According to SHRM, the most effective employee wellness programs infiltrate all employee levels, especially growing through encouragement from managers. “Wellness programs and engagement initiatives are certainly most effective when they have leadership support,” says Piliero.

Below are some simple wellness tips from LifeWorks to help engage employees in healthier activities:

  • Consider allowing time for brief walks during lunch. A quick, 10-minute walk is enough of a break to regain focus.
  • Encourage co-workers to have a workout buddy. People are twice as likely to workout if they have a partner.
  • Circulate articles about wellness at work. Recognizing where changes can be made is often an important first step.

Creating a culture of wellness and engagement through promoting healthy activities and initiatives can play an important part in boosting employee morale. And while it is unlikely that employee wellness programs will recover the billions lost to lack of concern in the cubicles, such programs seem to make strides in the fight against employee disinterest.

For more information:

  • Learn about Ceridian LifeWorks employee assistance and wellness programs
  • Watch our LifeWorks wellness and engagement video
  • Be on the lookout for exciting enhancements coming to Ceridian LifeWorks Wellness Services over the next few months!

 

 


[1] According to a report from the U.S. Department of Labor and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.