On July 26, 2010, the nation celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the first comprehensive declaration of equality for individuals with disabilities. The act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, state and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation and telecommunications. 

ADA celebrates its 20th anniversary . . . A look at the past 20 years

On July 26, 2010, the nation celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), the first comprehensive declaration of equality for individuals with disabilities. The act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, state and local government, public accommodations, commercial facilities, transportation and telecommunications.

At the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act on July 26, 1990, President George H. W. Bush stated, "Three weeks ago we celebrated our nation's Independence Day. Today we're here to rejoice in and celebrate another 'independence day,' one that is long overdue. With today's signing of the landmark Americans for Disabilities Act, every man, woman, and child with a disability can now pass through once-closed doors into a bright new era of equality, independence, and freedom."--President George Bush at the Signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act

Since that day, the ADA has vastly expanded opportunities for all individuals with disabilities by protecting their individual rights and helping to remove and reduce many social and physical barriers for them.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 50 million Americans are disabled with at least one physical or mental impairment, and the number of Americans with disabilities continues to increase. Ceridian HR compliance products and services help businesses nationwide stay compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act.


ADA Statistics 
According to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC): 

  • 1993: 15,274 discrimination charges were filed with the EEOC, which obtained $15,496,811 in relief for 1,851 people though its administrative process.
  • 2009: 21,451 discrimination charges were filed -- approximately a 30 percent increase. The EEOC obtained $67,826,112 in relief for 3,238 people.
  • From 1993 to 2009, ADA charges rose from 17.4 percent of all charges filed with the EEOC to 23 percent of all charges filed as ADA charges became a greater part of the EEOC's workload.
  • From 1993 to 2009, the EEOC filed 874 lawsuits claiming violations of the ADA, collecting a total of $86,633,804 for victims of disability discrimination.


(Source: U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission)

ADA Statistics on the job 
According U.S. Census Bureau: 

  • 13.3 million 16- to 64-year-olds reported difficulty finding a job or remaining employed because of a health condition
  • 46 percent of people aged 21 to 64 with some type of disability were employed. The employment rate ranged from 75 percent of those with a nonsevere disability to 31 percent with a severe disability. For those without a disability, the employment rate was 84 percent for the same period
  • 59 percent of people aged 21 to 64 with hearing difficulty were employed. The corresponding percentage for those with difficulty seeing was 41 percent
  • 48 percent of people aged 21 to 64 with a nonsevere disability worked full time. This compares with 63 percent for those without a disability and 16 percent for those with a severe disability
  • 6 percent of disabled workers 16 and older used public transportation to commute to work. In addition, 69 percent of people with a disability drove alone, 13 percent carpooled, 4 percent walked and 3 percent used a taxicab, motorcycle, bicycle or other means of transportation
  • 21 percent of disabled workers aged 16 and older worked in the educational services and health care and social assistance industries


(Source: 20th Anniversary of Americans with Disabilities Act: July 26)