romeo-and-chelsea-hightower-on-dancing-with-the-stars_gallery_primary.jpgOne of “Dancing With the Stars” favorite couples, Romeo and Chelsea Hightower, were voted off in this eighth week of competition. While ABC News reported that “judges had praised Romeo’s dramatic improvement and commitment,” he and Chelsea did not make it to the final four. President Obama’s immigration reform proposal appears destined for the same fate.

The president visited El Paso, Texas, on Tuesday in an effort to boost support for comprehensive immigration reform legislation that among other things would create a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Like Romeo and Chelsea, the idea of immigration reform enjoys support, including for proposals like the so-called “DREAM Act” that would promise citizenship for some children of illegal immigrants.

But the obstacles to enactment are formidable and it’s not likely that comprehensive immigration reform legislation will make it to the “final four” of new public laws. Read more.

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Immigration Reform: Dancing With The Stars?

Fri May 13, 2011

romeo-and-chelsea-hightower-on-dancing-with-the-stars_gallery_primary.jpgOne of “Dancing With the Stars” favorite couples, Romeo and Chelsea Hightower, were voted off in this eighth week of competition. While ABC News reported that “judges had praised Romeo’s dramatic improvement and commitment,” he and Chelsea did not make it to the final four. President Obama’s immigration reform proposal appears destined for the same fate.

The president visited El Paso, Texas, on Tuesday in an effort to boost support for comprehensive immigration reform legislation that among other things would create a pathway to citizenship for undocumented immigrants. Like Romeo and Chelsea, the idea of immigration reform enjoys support, including for proposals like the so-called “DREAM Act” that would promise citizenship for some children of illegal immigrants.

But the obstacles to enactment are formidable and it’s not likely that comprehensive immigration reform legislation will make it to the “final four” of new public laws.

For one thing, the Department of Homeland Security estimates that there are some 11 million undocumented immigrants in the U.S., suggesting that border security remains a question. For another, Congress is focused like a laser beam on the federal budget deficit, the staggering U.S. public debt and the ongoing crisis of almost 14 million without work.

Finally, it’s doubtful that a politically divided Congress can reach consensus on immigration reform in 2011 when a democrat-controlled House, Senate and White House could not achieve it in 2010.

So it’s back to Dancing With the Stars’ Romeo and Chelsea for immigration reform this year. A bright star with lots of enthusiasm and support but not enough to win the Mirror Ball Trophy.